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Getting goosebumps when listening to music could treat psychological disorders

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Do you get goosebumps or a “frog in your throat” when you listen to music? These sensations are unique and actually quite rare.

A former undergraduate at Harvard, Matthew Sachs, studied students that get these sensations when they listen to music. Of the 20 students he studied, 10 stated they received goosebumps or the lump in their throat, and 10 of them didn’t. He did a brain scan on all of the students.

Matthew Sachs concluded that students that become emotionally and physically attached to music actually have different brain structures. His research showed that these students have a “denser volume of fibers that connect their auditory cortex and areas that process emotions.”

“The idea being that more fibers and increased efficiency between two regions means that you have more efficient processing between them.”

Sachs is continuing this research and will examine the brain’s activity when listening to certain songs that achieve certain reactions. He’s hoping that the research will conclude that these reactions can actually treat psychological disorders.

“Depression causes an inability to experience pleasure of everyday things. You could use music with a therapist to explore feelings.

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